Historical Background

Last updated: 
22/11/2017

 

Since the beginning of its formation in the thirties of the last century, the State of Bahrain has focused on social development issues. The early discovery of oil has contributed to speeding the pace of developing infrastructure and establishing the foundations of a modern state by opening schools and providing medical services by State-supported hospitals.

 

Upon the formation of the first government in 1970 under Decree No. (3) for 1970 to appoint the Chairman, State Council members, and heads of government departments, Mr. Jawad Salim Al Arrayed was appointed as the Head of Labour and Social Affairs Department and member of the State Council.

 

Following the declaration of Bahrain’s independence in 1973 and joining the United Nations and the League of Arab States, the first, post-independence ministerial formation was announced and Mr. Ibrahim Humaidan was appointed as the Minister of Labour and Social Affairs.

 

The Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs has assumed the responsibility of providing job opportunities for Bahrainis of both sexes. The Ministry has also taken the initiative of establishing departments and directorates to be concerned with work and workers’ issues, and developing plans and programmes in order to improve the abilities and efficiencies of the Bahraini worker so that he can participate effectively in the social development plans.

 

With the improvement witnessed in different sectors of the State during the eighties and nineties with the help of the unlimited support offered by the State, it was necessary to direct more attention to the social and developmental work as a natural response to meet the expansion of the society’s requirements. Such development has called for cooperation among governmental establishments and civil society organizations with the aim of finding the best possible means to provide care for man and qualify him to become an active and productive member to serve his country.

 

It is worth mentioning that the month of January 2005 is considered a remarkable event in the march of social development in the Kingdom of Bahrain. It marks the issuance of Royal Decree No. (29) which decides the separation of the social affairs sector from the Ministry of Labour so that the social affairs would become an independent ministry. Dr. Fatima Bint Mohammed Al Balushi was appointed as the head of this ministry. Following that, Decree No. (73) for 2005 was issued to change the Ministry’s name to  the Ministry of Social Development (MOSD).

 

To keep pace with these achievements, MOSD has sought to work on the dissemination of social welfare and social rehabilitation among a large segment of citizens in need of these services, and developed various programmes that contribute to improving the standard of living of needy families through self-work opportunities which ensure a decent life for the Bahraini individual in his society.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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